Bats, Birds, Bugs and Us

dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Peter
dc.contributor.authorAdelaide Festival Corporation
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-09T23:30:41Z
dc.date.available2011-11-09T23:30:41Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.description.abstractAdelaide Festival of Ideas session, Bonython Hall, 10:00am, Saturday 8th October, 2001. Chaired by Chris Burrald. Hendra, Nipah, Ebola, Marburg, SARS – names that are variously familiar to all of us. What links them in our minds is the idea of scary, lethal infections. What links these viruses in nature is that they are unapparent infections of fruit bats. Bats are the most abundant mammals on the planet. Birds are everywhere too, and birds are the primary reservoirs of the influenza A viruses and a spectrum of mosquito-borne infections. Though we’ve known for years about vampire bats spreading rabies in South America, the awareness that bat-carried diseases can be a major threat is very recent. What has changed?en
dc.description.urihttp://adelaidefestivalofideas.com.au
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/25628
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRadio Adelaideen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAdelaide Festival of Ideas : Planning for Uncertainty ; 7th-9th October 2011.en
dc.rightsArchived with permission from the Adelaide Festival of Ideas and Radio Adelaide.en
dc.subjectVirusesen
dc.subjectInfectious diseasesen
dc.subjectFruit batsen
dc.titleBats, Birds, Bugs and Usen
dc.typeRecording, oralen
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