Camouflage: how the visual arts and sociology make sense of the military

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Date
2009
Authors
Wadham, Benjamin Allan
Hamilton, Amy Ruth
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
The Australian Sociological Association
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Abstract
The military is the core institution of state sanctioned violence in Western liberal democracies. In the last decade or so the role of the military has changed and militarism has become an increasingly conspicuous aspect of public life. The idea of camouflage is used and developed to explore how collaboration between the visual arts and sociology can be used to denaturalise the taken-for-granted assumptions and beliefs about the military in Australian society. Camouflage is explained in its military utility, its psychological concept (Gestalt theory) the art camouflage movement and their developed techniques (eg Cubism, Dadaism), and in terms of deconstruction or sociological critique as a tool for making social relations that are culturally camouflaged visible.
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Keywords
Visual arts, Military organisations, Sociology
Citation
Wadham, B.A. & Hamilton, A.R., 2009. Camouflage: how the visual arts and sociology make sense of the military. The Future of Sociology. Proceedings of the Australian Sociological Association conference 2009, 1-14.