‘I want to bring him from the aeroplane to here’: The meaning of animals to children of refugee or migrant backgrounds resettled in Australia

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Date
2016-11-19
Authors
Riggs, Damien Wayne
Due, Clemence
Taylor, Nik
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Wiley
Rights
© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and National Children’s Bureau. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Rights Holder
© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and National Children’s Bureau
Abstract
Separation from animals with whom children have caring relationships can lead to considerable loss and grief, perhaps especially in the case of migration. This article reports on a thematic analysis of interviews undertaken with children of migrant or refugee backgrounds who had resettled in Australia. Findings suggest that children who spoke about animals framed their experiences in ways that either evoked a sense of loss with regard to animals or referred to animals as engendering a safe haven following resettlement. The article concludes by exploring potential service responses and encourages a focus on animals' needs in the context of migration.
Description
This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ This author accepted manuscript is made available following 24 month embargo from date of publication (November 2016) in accordance with the publisher’s archiving policy
Keywords
service provision, resettlement, loss and grief, animals, forced migration, children, migrants, refugees
Citation
Riggs, D.W., Due, C. & Taylor, N., (2016). ‘I want to bring him from the aeroplane to here’: The meaning of animals to children of refugee or migrant backgrounds resettled in Australia. Children and Society, 31(3): 219-230.