The impact of industrial relations systems on training: Evidence from selected industrialised economies

dc.contributor.authorLansbury, R.D
dc.contributor.authorPickersgill, R
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-09T02:17:57Z
dc.date.available2014-07-09T02:17:57Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.description.abstractThis paper argues that different systems of industrial relations foster or discourage social dialogue in relation to training and other matters. Countries which have more cooperative or consensual based systems of industrial relations tend to have greater dialogue between the social partners on training than those which do not. They also appear to have more comprehensive and integrated approaches to training at micro and macro levels. It should be emphasised that while industrial relations do not act in a deterministic way to create particular training outcomes, they appear to have an important influence on these issues. Furthermore, while the institutional bases of industrial relations systems are in the process of change and the concept of social partnership is becoming broader, social dialogue is likely to continue to play an important role in skill formation and development.en
dc.identifier.citationLansbury, R.D., Pickersgill, R., 2002. The impact of industrial relations systems on training: Evidence from selected industrialised economies. Australian Bulletin of Labour, Vol. 28 No. 4, pp. 284-299en
dc.identifier.issn0311-6336
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/27783
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNational Institute of Labour Studiesen
dc.titleThe impact of industrial relations systems on training: Evidence from selected industrialised economiesen
dc.typeArticleen
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