Building resilience: A preliminary exploration of women's perceptions of the use of acupuncture as an adjunct to In Vitro Fertilisation

dc.contributor.author Paterson, Charlotte
dc.contributor.author De Lacey, Sheryl Lynne
dc.contributor.author Smith, Caroline A
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-30T06:10:47Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-30T06:10:47Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.description © 2009 de Lacey et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.description.abstract Background : In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) is now an accepted and effective treatment for infertility, however IVF is acknowledged as contributing to, rather than lessening, the overall psychosocial effects of infertility. Psychological and counselling interventions have previously been widely recommended in parallel with infertility treatments but whilst in many jurisdictions counselling is recommended or mandatory, it may not be widely used. Acupuncture is increasingly used as an adjunct to IVF, in this preliminary study we sought to investigate the experience of infertile women who had used acupuncture to improve their fertility. Methods : A sample of 20 women was drawn from a cohort of women who had attended for a minimum of four acupuncture sessions in the practices of two acupuncturists in South Australia. Eight women were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Six had sought acupuncture during IVF treatment and two had begun acupuncture to enhance their fertility and had later progressed to IVF. Descriptive content analysis was employed to analyse the data. Results : Four major categories of perceptions about acupuncture in relation to reproductive health were identified: (a) Awareness of, and perceived benefits of acupuncture; (b) perceptions of the body and the impact of acupuncture upon it; (c) perceptions of stress and the impact of acupuncture on resilience; and (d) perceptions of the intersection of medical treatment and acupuncture. Conclusion : This preliminary exploration, whilst confined to a small sample of women, confirms that acupuncture is indeed perceived by infertile women to have an impact to their health. All findings outlined here are reported cautiously because they are limited by the size of the sample. They suggest that further studies of acupuncture as an adjunct to IVF should systematically explore the issues of wellbeing, anxiety, personal and social resilience and women's identity in relation to sexuality and reproduction. en
dc.identifier.citation De Lacey, S.L., Smith, C.A. and Paterson, C. (2009). Building resilience: A preliminary exploration of women's perceptions of the use of acupuncture as an adjunct to In Vitro Fertilisation. BMC Alternative Medicine, 9(50) pp. 1-11. en
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-9-50 en
dc.identifier.issn 1472-6882
dc.identifier.rmid 2006014010
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2328/32773
dc.rights © 2009 de Lacey et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights.holder de Lacey et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights.license CC-BY
dc.subject.forgroup 1110 Nursing en
dc.title Building resilience: A preliminary exploration of women's perceptions of the use of acupuncture as an adjunct to In Vitro Fertilisation en
dc.type Article en
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Thumbnail Image
Name:
2006014010.pdf
Size:
192.7 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
Published Version