Vegetable Diversity, Injurious Falls, and Fracture Risk in Older Women: A Prospective Cohort Study

dc.contributor.author Sim, Marc
dc.contributor.author Blekkenhorst, Lauren C
dc.contributor.author Lewis, Joshua R
dc.contributor.author Bondonno, Catherine P
dc.contributor.author Devine, Amanda
dc.contributor.author Zhu, Kun
dc.contributor.author Woodman, Richard John
dc.contributor.author Prince, Richard L
dc.contributor.author Hodgson, Jonathan M
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-17T23:20:27Z
dc.date.available 2018-10-17T23:20:27Z
dc.date.issued 2018-08-13
dc.description This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en_US
dc.description.abstract The importance of vegetable diversity for the risk of falling and fractures is unclear. Our objective was to examine the relationship between vegetable diversity with injurious falling and fractures leading to hospitalization in a prospective cohort of older Australian women (n = 1429, ≥70 years). Vegetable diversity was quantified by assessing the number of different vegetables consumed daily. Vegetable intake (75 g servings/day) was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline (1998). Over 14.5 years, injurious falls (events = 568, 39.7%), and fractures (events = 404, 28.3%) were captured using linked health records. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models, women with greater vegetable diversity (per increase in one different vegetable/day) had lower relative hazards for falls (8%; p = 0.02) and fractures (9%; p = 0.03). A significant interaction between daily vegetable diversity (number/day) and total vegetable intake (75 g servings/day) was observed for falls (pinteraction = 0.03) and fractures (pinteraction < 0.001). The largest benefit of higher vegetable diversity were observed in the one third of women with the lowest vegetable intake (<2.2 servings/day; falls HR 0.83 95% CI (0.71–0.98); fractures HR 0.74 95%CI (0.62–0.89)). Increasing vegetable diversity especially in older women with low vegetable intake may be an effective way to reduce injurious fall and fracture risk. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship The Perth Longitudinal Study of Ageing in Women (PLSAW) was funded by Healthway, the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation, and by project grants 254627, 303169, and 572604 from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia. The salary of J.M.H. is supported by a NHMRC of Australia Senior Research Fellowship and a Royal Perth Hospital Medical Research Foundation Fellowship. The salary of J.R.L. is supported by a NHMRC of Australia Career Development Fellowship (ID: 1107474). en_US
dc.identifier.citation Sim, M., Blekkenhorst, L. C., Lewis, J. R. et al., (2018). Vegetable Diversity, Injurious Falls, and Fracture Risk in Older Women: A Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients, 10: 1081. en_US
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081081 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2072-6643
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2328/38424
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher MDPI en_US
dc.relation.grantnumber NHMRC/254627 en_US
dc.relation.grantnumber NHMRC/303169 en_US
dc.relation.grantnumber NHMRC/572604 en_US
dc.relation.grantnumber NHMRC/1107474 en_US
dc.rights © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). en_US
dc.rights.holder © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. en_US
dc.rights.license CC-BY
dc.subject nutrition en_US
dc.subject epidemiology en_US
dc.subject ageing en_US
dc.subject Musculoskeletal health en_US
dc.subject geriatrics en_US
dc.subject injury en_US
dc.title Vegetable Diversity, Injurious Falls, and Fracture Risk in Older Women: A Prospective Cohort Study en_US
dc.type Article en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookup Sim, Marc: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5166-0605 en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookup Blekkenhorst, Lauren C: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1561-9052 en_US
local.contributor.authorOrcidLookup Devine, Amanda: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6978-6249 en_US
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