Mental contamination: Relationship with Psychopathology and Transdiagnostic Processes

dc.contributor.authorCoughtrey, Anna
dc.contributor.authorShafran, Roz
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorKothari, Radha
dc.contributor.authorWade, Tracey Diane
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-10T02:45:14Z
dc.date.available2018-07-10T02:45:14Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-23
dc.description© 2017 Elsevier. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ This author accepted manuscript is made available following 24 month embargo from date of publication (August 2017) in accordance with the publisher’s archiving policyen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Mental contamination, the experience of feeling dirty in the absence of physical uncleanliness, is closely associated with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Given that many features of OCD are found in other diagnoses, the primary aim of this study was to determine whether mental contamination is specific to OCD or whether it is also associated with psychopathology found in other disorders. We hypothesised that, in addition to OCD symptoms, mental contamination would be associated with other psychopathology, in particular symptoms of depression, anxiety and eating disorders, and with transdiagnostic processes such as perfectionism. Methods 120 participants (82%) completed measures of psychological disorders and transdiagnostic processes. Results were analysed using Pearson's r correlations and a multiple regression analysis. Results Mental contamination was most strongly associated with symptoms of OCD but was also associated with eating disorder symptoms, depression and anxiety. It was also correlated with perfectionism, intolerance of uncertainty and fear of compassion. OCD, eating disorder symptoms, fear of compassion and low self-esteem were significant independent predictors of mental contamination. Conclusions Mental contamination is associated with a range of psychopathology but is most strongly associated with symptoms of OCD. Further research is warranted to advance treatment for mental contamination.en_US
dc.identifier.citationCoughtrey, A., Shafran, R., Bennett, S., Kothari, R., & Wade, T. (2018). Mental contamination: Relationship with psychopathology and transdiagnostic processes. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 17, 39– 45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2017.08.009en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2017.08.009en
dc.identifier.issn2211-3649
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2328/38139
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.oaire.license.condition.licenseCC-BY-NC-ND
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier.en_US
dc.rights.holderElsevier.en_US
dc.subjectmental contaminationen_US
dc.subjecttransdiganostic processesen_US
dc.subjectOCDen_US
dc.titleMental contamination: Relationship with Psychopathology and Transdiagnostic Processesen_US
dc.typeArticleen
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